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Occurrence and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in trap cultures from limestone mining sites and un-mined forest soil of Mawsmai, Meghalaya

Abstract

The association and diversity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) in trap cultures from soil derived inocula of limestone mine sites of Mawsmai village, Cherrapunjee, Meghalaya were studied for one crop cycle using Maize (Zea mays L.) as the trap plant under laboratory conditions. Rhizospheric soil samples from three mine sites and un-mined site were collected for the entire study based on the degree of disturbance; limestone mine spoils less than 2 years (LMS2), limestone mine spoils less than 8 years (LMS8), limestone mine spoils more than 14 years (LMS14) and adjacent un-mined forest site (CPF). A low to high level of AMF root colonization was observed in trap cultures of LMS2, LMS8, LMS14 and CPF derived inocula. A total diversity of 77 AMF species belonging to 17 genera were isolated and identified from trap cultures. The AMF species with 100% isolation frequency were Acaulospora lacunosa, A. laevis, Funneliformis coronatum, F. geosporum, F. mosseae, Gigaspora margarita, Gi. rosea, Glomus ambisporum, Gl. botryoides, Gl. citricola, Gl. fasciculatum, Gl. macrocarpum, Rhizophagus intraradices and Septoglomus constrictum. Highest species diversity and richness was observed in LMS14 followed by CPF while lowest in LMS2. Highest species dominance was found in LMS2 while lowest in CPF. The Bray Curtis resemblance matrix was highest between LMS14 and CPF while lowest in LMS2 and LMS14. The diversity of AMF from limestone mine spoils and un-mined forest site is highly remarkable in terms of species richness and composition and this will be the first report from North Eastern India to harbour a good number of AMF species diversity from alkaline soils. The objective of this study is to assess the diversity of AMF in trap cultures isolated from limestone mining sites and un-mined forest soil for taxonomic identification of AMF species, establishment of monospecific cultures and large scale production of AMF stress tolerance species. These resilient AMF species will be beneficial for re-vegetation of the mine spoils which can guaranteed and help plants to become established in the mining ecosystem.

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Acknowledgements

My sincere thanks go to Dr. P.N. Chowdhry, Director, National Centre of Fungal Taxonomy, (www.ncft.in), New Delhi for taxonomic identification of the AMF species.

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Correspondence to Ehkupar Gary Suting.

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Suting, E.G., Olivia Devi, N. Occurrence and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in trap cultures from limestone mining sites and un-mined forest soil of Mawsmai, Meghalaya. Trop Ecol 62, 525–537 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42965-021-00144-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42965-021-00144-7

Keywords

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
  • Diversity
  • Mawsmai
  • Meghalaya
  • Trap culture