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Marine phytoplankton diversity of Odisha coast, India with special reference to new record of diatoms and dinoflagellates

Abstract

The eastern part of Odisha is the coastal line covering the districts from Ganjam to Balasore. In the present investigation, a total 54 phytoplankton species under 30 genera were reported from different sites of east coast Odisha. The diversity of phytoplankton included three divisions such as Chlorophyta (02 species), Bacillariophyta (42 species) and Dinophyta (10 species). Altogether 21 phytoplanktons were for the first time from the Odisha coast, namely Alexandrium foedum Balech, Bleakeleya notata (Grunow) Round, Coscinodiscus asteromphalus Ehrenberg, Coscinodiscus granii L.F.Gough, Coscinodiscus radiatus Ehrenberg, Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst, Diploneis vacillan var. renitens (A.W.F.Schmidt) Cleve, Diploneis littoralis (Donkin) Cleve, Ditylum brightwellii (T.West) Grunow, Gonyaulax polygramma F.Stein, Hemiaulus membranaceus Cleve, Lampriscus shadboltianum (Greville) Peragallo & Peragallo, Pediastrum duplex var. subgranulatum Raciborski, Pediastrum simplex Meyen, Proboscia alata (Brightwell) Sundström, Pseudonitzschia seriata (Cleve) H. Peragallo, Rhizosolenia pungens A. Cleve-Euler, Stephanopyxis palmeriana (Greville) Grunow, Thalassionema nitzschioides (Grunow) Mereschkowsky, Thalassiosira eccentrica (Ehrenberg) Cleve and Thalassiosira oestrupii var venrickae G.Fryxell & Hasle. Furthermore, our results revealed that few diatom species such as Coscinodiscus asteromphalus Ehrenberg, Coscinodiscus centralis Ehrenberg, Coscinodiscus radiatus Ehrenberg, Coscinodiscus wailesii Gran & Angst, Bacteriastrum delicatulum Cleve and Bacteriastrum hyalinum Lauder were recorded in more than five sites of east coast Odisha. By the analysis of Bary-Curtis similarity cluster, similarity index, Jaccard’s similarity and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that these species have the ability to survive in the diverse ecological conditions. On the other hand, only two species of chlorophyceae namely Pediastrum simplex Meyen and Pediastrum duplex var. subgranulatum Raciborski were recorded in two sites of Bhadrak district only. Moreover, 14 bloom and toxin producing phytoplanktons were for the first time recorded in the present study.

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Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to MoEF and CC, Govt. of India (F.n. No. 22018/19/2015-Cs (TAX) for financial supports to carry out this study. The authors are also thankful to Berhampur University for providing necessary facilities to carry out this work. We are grateful to Prof. M.K. Misra, Department of Botany, Berhampur University, Odisha for suggestions to improve the manuscript. We are also thankful to Somanath Baral and Rabindra Nayak for their unconditional help for collecting samples.

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Correspondence to Mrutyunjay Jena.

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Pradhan, B., Maharana, S., Bhakta, S. et al. Marine phytoplankton diversity of Odisha coast, India with special reference to new record of diatoms and dinoflagellates. Vegetos (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42535-021-00301-2

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Keywords

  • Bacillariophyta
  • Bay of Bengal
  • Dinophyta
  • East coast
  • Multivariate analysis