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How Schools Often Make a Bad Situation Worse

Abstract

A serious information gap exists between current practices to address threats of violence in pre-K-12 school settings in the USA and research on school climate and best practices in violence prevention. This article explores the nature and extent of gun violence on American school campuses and examines responses by school administrators and policymakers to address these threats. Further, it explores research that suggests that many efforts to prevent or prepare for gun violence in schools, such as zero-tolerance policies, profiling, physical security measures, lockdowns, and active shooter drills, may not only be misguided but may also cause significant unintended harm to children. Finally, it examines current research that points to policies and practices that are more likely to foster safe and humane school settings.

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Limber, S.P., Kowalski, R.M. How Schools Often Make a Bad Situation Worse. Int. Journal on Child Malt. 3, 211–228 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42448-020-00045-7

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Keywords

  • School climate
  • School safety
  • School shootings
  • Violence prevention