Postdigital Anthropology: Hacks, Hackers, and the Human Condition

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Acknowledgments

The interview was transcribed by Gordon Asher and Leigh French. We extend our deepest thanks to Helen Alexandra Hayes for her thoughtful edits in the piece.

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Correspondence to Gabriella Coleman.

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Coleman, G., Jandrić, P. Postdigital Anthropology: Hacks, Hackers, and the Human Condition. Postdigit Sci Educ 1, 525–550 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42438-019-00065-8

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