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Postdigital Dialogue

Abstract

This article is a multi-authored experimental postdigital dialogue about postdigital dialogue. Fourteen authors were invited to produce their sections, followed by two author-reviewers who examined the article as a whole. Authors were invited to reflect on Petar Jandric’s book Learning in the age of digital reason (2017) or to produce completely new insights. The article also contains a summary of book symposium on Learning in the age of digital reason held at the 2017 American Educational Research Conference (AERA). The authors are tentatively confident that this article produces more knowledge than the arithmetic sum of its constituent parts. However, they are also very aware of its limits and insist that their conclusions are not consensual or homogenous. As traditional forms of research increasingly fail to describe our current reality, they present this article as an experiment and a possible starting point for developing new dialogical research approaches fit for our postdigital reality.

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Acknowledgements

Gordon would like to thank Leigh French and Antonia Darder for their helpful dialogical comments in the ‘The Postdigital: Dialogue, Democracy and Dissensus’ section.

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Correspondence to Petar Jandrić.

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Jandrić, P., Ryberg, T., Knox, J. et al. Postdigital Dialogue. Postdigit Sci Educ 1, 163–189 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42438-018-0011-x

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Keywords

  • postdigital
  • dialogue
  • conversation
  • science
  • education
  • critical pedagogy