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Steady Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two-Dimensional NACA0012 Airfoil for One Revolution Angle of Attack

  • Byung Ho Park
  • Yong Oun Han
Original Paper
  • 15 Downloads

Abstract

Steady variations in aerodynamic forces and flow behaviors of two-dimensional NACA0012 airfoil were investigated using a numerical method for One Revolution Angle of Attack (AOA) at Reynolds number of \(10^{5}\). The profiles of lift coefficients, drag coefficients, and pressure coefficients were compared with those of the experimental data. The AERODAS model was used to analyze the profiles of lift and drag coefficients. Wake characteristics were given along with the deficit profiles of incoming velocity components. Both the characteristics of normal and reverse airfoil models were compared with the basic aerodynamic data for the same range of AOA. The results show that two peaks of the lift coefficients appeared at \(11.5{^{\circ }}\) and \(42{^{\circ }}\) and are in good agreement with the pre-stall and post-stall models, respectively. Counter-rotating vortex flows originated from the leading and trailing edges at a high AOA, which formed an impermeable zone over the suction surface and made reattachments in the wake. Moreover, the acceleration of inflow along the boundary of the vortex wrap appeared in the profile of the wake velocity. The drag profile was found to be independent of the airfoil mode, but the lift profile was quite sensitive to the airfoil mode.

Keywords

Lift and drag coefficients High Angle of Attack Reverse airfoil mode Reattachment 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the 2014 Yeungnam University Research Grant.

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society for Aeronautical & Space Sciences and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringYeungnam UniversityGyeongsanRepublic of Korea

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