Skip to main content

Assessing Predictors of Cyberbullying Perpetration Among Adolescents: the Influence of Individual Factors, Attachments, and Prior Victimization

Abstract

Cyberbullying continues to be prevalent among adolescents, and advancing technology provides more ways for this harmful behavior to persist. Using data from the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children survey administered by the World Health Organization, this study examines the influence of individual, attachment, and victimization characteristics of 12,642 adolescents on the likelihood to cyberbully. Results from multivariate logistic regression models show that physical aggression, associations with peers who smoke cigarettes or carry weapons, prior cyberbullying victimization, and involvement in traditional bullying are associated with cyberbullying perpetration. Results underscore the need to ensure positive and strong attachments to parents, teachers, or peers to enhance cyberbullying prevention efforts. Implications for future research and practices are also discussed.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Notes

  1. The HBSC study was established in 1982, and its associated survey instrument is administered every 4 years.

  2. The USA did not participate in the most recent wave (2013/2014) of the HBSC survey.

  3. The National Crime Victimization Survey School Crime Supplement (SCS) and the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS).

References

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to G. R. Paez.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Paez, G.R. Assessing Predictors of Cyberbullying Perpetration Among Adolescents: the Influence of Individual Factors, Attachments, and Prior Victimization. Int Journal of Bullying Prevention 2, 149–159 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42380-019-00025-7

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42380-019-00025-7

Keywords

  • Cyberbullying
  • Attachments
  • Multivariate logistic regression