Advertisement

Journal of Bionic Engineering

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 356–367 | Cite as

Design and Analysis of a Rotational Leg-type Miniature Robot with an Actuated Middle Joint and a Tail (RoMiRAMT-II)

Article
  • 87 Downloads

Abstract

In this paper, a rotational leg-type miniature robot with a bioinspired actuated middle joint and a tail is proposed for stable locomotion and improved climbing ability. The robot has four independently actuated rotational legs, giving it advantages of both wheel-type and leg-type locomotion. The design parameters of the rotational legs were determined by 3D simulation within the seven candidates that selected by a newly proposed metric. It also has unique characteristics inspired by biological structures: a middle joint and a tail. An actuated middle joint allows the frontal body to be lifted or lowered, which was inspired by a flexible body joint of animals, to climb higher obstacles. Effectiveness of the middle joint was analytically verified by the geometric analysis of the robot. Additionally, a multi-functional one Degree Of Freedom (1-DOF) tail was added; the tail prevented the body being easily flipped, while allowed the robot to climb higher obstacles. A bristle-inspired micro structure was attached to the tail to enhance straightness of locomotion. Body size of the robot was 158 mm × 80 mm × 85 mm and weighed 581 g including a 7.4 V Li-Polymer battery. The average velocity of the robot was 2.74 m·s−1 (17.67 body lengths per second) and the maximum height of an obstacle that the robot could climb was 106 mm (2.5 times of leg length), which all were verified by experiments.

Keywords

locomotion rotational leg actuated middle joint actuated tail bionic miniature robot 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the 2017 Research Fund (1.170013.01) of UNIST(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, the 2012 Creativity & Innovation Research Fund (1.120047.01) of UNIST, and the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF- 2015R1C1A1A01053763 ).

References

  1. [1]
    Hoover A M, Steltz E, Fearing R S. RoACH: An autonomous 2.4 g crawling hexapod robot. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Nice, France, 2008, 26–33.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Hoffman K L, Wood R J. Passive undulatory gaits enhance walking in a myriapod millirobot. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, San Francisco, USA, 2011, 1479–1486.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Birkmeyer P, Peterson K, Fearing R S. Dash: A dynamic 16g hexapedal robot. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, St. Louis, USA, 2009, 2683–2689.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Kim S, Clark J E, Cutkosky M R. iSprawl: Design and tuning for high-speed autonomous open-loop running. In ternational Journal of Robotics Research, 2006, 25, 903–912.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Siles I, Walker I D. Design, construction, and testing of a new class of mobile robots for cave exploration. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics, Malaga, Spain, 2009, 1–6.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Saranli U, Buehler M, Koditschek D E. RHex: A simple and highly mobile hexapod robot. International Journal of Robotics Research, 2001, 20, 616–631.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    Boxerbaum A S, Werk P, Quinn R D, Vaidyanathan R. Design of an autonomous amphibious robot for surf zone operation: Part I mechanical design for multi-mode mobility. Proceedings of the IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, Monterey, USA, 2005, 1459–1464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    Harkins R, Ward J, Vaidyanathan R, Boxerbaum A S, Quinn R D. Design of an autonomous amphibious robot for surf zone operation: Part II hardware, control implementation and simulation. Proceedings of the IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, Monterey, USA, 2005, 1465–1470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Allen T J, Quinn R D, Bachmann R J, Ritzmann R E. Abstracted biological principles applied with reduced actuation improve mobility of legged vehicles. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Las Vegas, USA, 2003, 1370–1375.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Klein M A, Boxerbaum A S, Quinn R D, Harkins R, Vaidyanathan R. Seadog: A rugged mobile robot for surf-zone applications. Proceedings of the IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, Roma, Italy, 2012, 1335–1340.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Morrey J M, Lambrecht B, Horchler A D, Ritzmann R E, Quinn R D. Highly mobile and robust small quadruped robots. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Las Vegas, USA, 2003, 82–87.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Lambrecht B G A, Horchler A D, Quinn R D. A small, insect-inspired robot that runs and jumps. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Barcelona, Spain, 2005.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Kwak B, Bae J. Design and analysis of a rotational leg-type miniature robot with an actuated middle joint and a tail (romiramt). Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Hamburg, Germany, 2015, 2148–2153.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Brown C Y, Vogtmann D E, Bergbreiter S. Efficiency and effectiveness analysis of a new direct drive miniature quadruped robot. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Karlsruhe, Germany, 2013, 5631–5637.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Stager A, Karydis K, Tanner H G. A passively sprawling miniature legged robot. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Seattle, USA, 2015, 3134–3139.Google Scholar
  16. [16]
    Zarrouk D, Pullin A, Kohut N, Fearing R S. Star, a sprawl tuned autonomous robot. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Karlsruhe, Germany, 2013, 20–25.Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    Boxerbaum A S, Oro J, Peterson G, Quinn R D. Introducing dagsi whegs: The latest generation of whegs robots, featuring a passive-compliant body joint. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Pasadena, USA, 2008, 1636–1641.Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    Dunker P A, Lewinger W A, Hunt A J, Quinn R D. A biologically inspired robot for lunar in-situ resource utilization. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, St. Louis, USA, 2009, 5039–5044.Google Scholar
  19. [19]
    Coppelia Robotics, V-REP. [2016-03-02], http://www.coppeliarobotics.com/Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    Watson J T, Ritzmann R E, Zill S N. Control of obstacle climbing in the cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis. I. Kinematics. Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 2002, 188, 39–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. [21]
    Harley C M, English B A, Ritzmann R E. Characterization of obstacle negotitation behaviors in the cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis. Journal of Experimental Biology, 2009, 212, 1463–1476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. [22]
    Willey J S, Biknevicius A R, Reilly S M, Earls K D. The tale of the tail: Limb function and locomotor mechanics in Alligator mississippiensis. Journal of Experimental Biology, 2004, 207, 553–563.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. [23]
    O’Connor S M, Dawson T J, Kram R, Donelan J M. The kangaroo’s tail propels and powers pentapedal locomotion. Biology Letters, 2014, 12, 1744–957X.Google Scholar
  24. [24]
    Patel A, Braae M. Rapid turning at high-speed: Inspirations from the cheetah’s tail. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Tokyo, Japan, 2013, 5506–5511.Google Scholar
  25. [25]
    Chang-Siu E, Libby T, Tomizuka M, Full R J. A lizard- inspired active tail enables rapid maneuvers and dynamic stabilization in a terrestrial robot. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, San Francisco, USA, 2011, 1887–1894.Google Scholar
  26. [26]
    Alexander R M. Principles of Animal Locomotion, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, USA, 2003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. [27]
    Tribology System Friction & Wear Test System, Neoplus, [2016-03-03], http://i-neoplus.co.kr/english_index.phpGoogle Scholar
  28. [28]
    Dow corning: Silicone solutions, products and technologies, dow corning, [2016-02-02], http://www.dowcorning.com/Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Jilin University 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUNISTUlsanKorea

Personalised recommendations