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The effect of androstenedione supplementation on testosterone, estradiol, body composition, and lipid profile: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Abstract

Objective

To date, no meta-analysis has been carried out to collect evidence from randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) for the purpose of comprehensively summarizing the effect of androstenedione supplementation. Therefore, the aim of this research was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of all RCTs that explored the effect of androstenedione supplementation on individual hormonal, lipid, and anthropometric indices.

Methods

We searched five databases (Web of Science, SCOPUS, Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and Google Scholar) using a combination of medical subject headings (MeSH) and non-MeSH terms. Using the random-effects model, we summarized the outcomes as weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results

Eight eligible articles were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled effect sizes suggested a significant effect of androstenedione supplementation on serum estradiol concentrations (WMD: 20.82 ng/ml, 95% CI: 7.25 to 34.38, p = 0.003), triglycerides (TG, WMD: -0.19 mg/dl, 95% CI: − 0.96, 0.57, p = 0.000), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (WMD: − 0.13 mg/dl, 95% CI: − 0.23 to − 0.03, p = 0.009); however, it had no effect on testosterone (WMD: 0.098 ng/ml, 95% CI: − 0.499 to 0.696, p = 0.748), body weight (WMD: 0.579 kg, 95% CI: − 4.02 to 5.17, p = 0.805), body mass index (BMI, WMD: − 0.73 kg/m2, 95% CI: − 2.98, 1.50, p = 0.519), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (WMD: − 0.074 mg/dl, 95% CI: − 0.37 to 0.22, p = 0.622), and total cholesterol (TC, WMD: − 0.15 mg/dl, 95% CI: − 0.49, 0.17, p = 0.198).

Conclusion

These findings indicate that androstenedione supplementation can lower TG and HDL-cholesterol and increase estradiol concentrations.

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Correspondence to Xiang Gao.

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Pang, Q., Jia, A., Al Masri, M.K. et al. The effect of androstenedione supplementation on testosterone, estradiol, body composition, and lipid profile: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Hormones (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42000-022-00385-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42000-022-00385-8

Keywords

  • Androstenedione
  • Estradiol
  • Testosterone
  • Elderly
  • Lipid profile
  • Body weight
  • BMI