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Prevention and control of dental erosion by professionally applied treatment

  • John A. Kaidonis
  • Poppy M. Anastassiadis
  • Dimitra Lekkas
  • Sarbin Ranjitkar
  • Grant C. Townsend
  • Bennett T. AmaechiEmail author
Treatment
  • 635 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Caries

Abstract

Dental erosion is a type of tooth wear that occurs when the tooth is exposed to acids. It can be prevented by elimination or reduction of the acid challenge. Prevention should also aim at the remineralization of softened enamel by the enhancement of saliva remineralizing function through the use of fluoride formulations. The use of professionally applied products for the prevention and control of dental erosion should be a part of an overall preventive management program that includes home management by the patient. Each management plan needs to follow a preventive philosophy that is tailor-made for the patient. There is a plethora of products available for erosion management, each with their specific formulations and different concentrations. However, the availability of the products as well as their generic names varies in different parts of the world. Although examples of specific products will be mentioned in this article, the emphasis will be on general methods with reference to generic products in order to guide management.

keywords

Erosive toothwear Acid erosion Erosion prevention Surface protection Erosion control 

Notes

Acknowledgement

Funding was provided by University of Texas System.

Further reading

  1. 1.
    Kaidonis JA, Anastassiadis PM, Lekkas D, Ranjitkar S, Amaechi BT, Townsend GC (2015) Prevention and control of dental erosion: professional clinic care. In: Amaechi BT (ed) Dental erosion and its clinical management. Springer, Cham, pp 151–168.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-13993-7_9 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Amaechi BT, Higham SM (2005) Dental erosion: possible approaches to prevention and control. J Dent 33(3):243–252CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lussi A, Ganss C (2014) Erosive tooth wear: from diagnosis to therapy. Monographs in oral science. Karger, BaselGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kaidonis JA (2012) Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: part 4. Non-carious tooth surface loss and assessment of risk. Br Dent J 213(4):155–161CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hannig M, Hannig C (2014) The pellicle and erosion. In: Lussi A, Ganss C (eds) Erosive tooth wear: from diagnosis to therapy. Monographs in oral science, 2nd edn. Karger, Basel, pp 206–214Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Huysmans M-C, Young A, Ganss C (2014) The role of fluoride in erosion therapy. In: Lussi A, Ganss C (eds) Erosive tooth wear: from diagnosis to therapy. Monographs in oral science, 2nd edn. Karger, Basel, pp 230–243Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health SciencesThe University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Comprehensive DentistryUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA

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