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Development and Characterization of Edible Film Made from Mango Kernel Starch

Abstract

The current study presents a new biopolymer mango kernel starch (MKS) for the preparation of edible/biodegradable films using casting technique. Different concentrations (40–70% w/w) of glycerol (G), sorbitol (S) and 1:1 mixture of glycerol and sorbitol were incorporated as plasticizers into the film matrix and the resulting physical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties of the films were investigated. The glycerol plasticized films were thicker and also presented higher moisture content as compared to their counterparts. Despite of plasticizer type, the tensile strength of MKS film decreased, while elongation at break (%E) increased with increasing plasticizer concentration. The effect of plasticizers on glass transition temperature (Tg) was characterized using differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperature of MKS films were largely affected by the concentration of plasticizer and increased significantly as the plasticizer concentration increased, predominantly for G-plasticized films. XRD analysis showed diminished crystalline peaks while the color parameters of MKS film became more acceptable by increasing the concentration of plasticizers and produced more transparent films as L and a value were observed to increase significantly while b values decreased. In general, the present study manifested that mango kernel starch may be considered as a promising biopolymer for producing biodegradable films.

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Correspondence to Alina Hadi.

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Practical application

In this study an underutilized but abundant source of starch (extracted from mango kernels) was used to develop edible film for food packaging purpose. The study provides significant results for the functional attributes of mango kernel starch based edible film that can eventually exploit this low-cost source for future applications as a novel food packaging material.

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Nawab, A., Alam, F., Hadi, A. et al. Development and Characterization of Edible Film Made from Mango Kernel Starch. J Package Technol Res 6, 63–72 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41783-022-00132-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s41783-022-00132-9

Keywords

  • Mango kernel starch
  • Edible film
  • Plasticizers