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CPAP Compliance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

A Correction to this article was published on 14 October 2019

This article has been updated

Abstract

OSA is a common sleep-related breathing disorder, characterized by frequent interruptions of breathing during sleep and leading public health problem both in the developed and developing nations. However, awareness regarding diagnostic options, management, and consequences of untreated OSA remains inadequate. In developing nations, the resources for adequate sleep medicine facilities are scarce. Therefore, there is a need for low cost, simple and accurate diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. The most effective treatment for patients with significant OSA has been a CPAP device which delivers positive air pressure to the airway. Despite the efficacy of CPAP for the treatment of OSA, compliance with therapy remains suboptimal. This acts as a physiological splint, thus preventing collapse of the upper airway. Compliance rates were 30−80% from different parts of the globe. The adverse effects of untreated OSA were well documented and have been shown to be reversible with therapy. Therefore, an increase in CPAP compliance is considered clinically relevant. It is important that adherence to CPAP therapy continues to be improved. Increase CPAP compliance is essential thus it is important that adherence to CPAP therapy is enforced. Measures for good CPAP compliance are patient education, a good doctor−patient relationship, role of partner/family, and an intensive follow-up program, which can be addressed through a multidisciplinary team approach.

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  • 14 October 2019

    The article “CPAP Compliance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea” written by Manvir Bhatia, was originally published electronically on the publisher’s internet portal (currently SpringerLink) on August 10, 2019 with open access. With the author(s) decision to step back from Open Choice, the copyright of the article changed to © Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019 and the article is forthwith distributed under the terms of copyright.

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Geeta Yadav, Mahi Yadav, and the staff of Neurology Sleep Centre for their help.

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Correspondence to Manvir Bhatia.

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Bhatia, M., Singh, Y. CPAP Compliance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Sleep Vigilance 3, 113–118 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41782-019-00070-8

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Keywords

  • CPAP compliance
  • OSA: obstructive sleep apnea