Multiple Dimensions of Wellness: Development and Psychometric Properties of the Anschutz Wellness Evaluation 360 (AWE 360)

Abstract

Wellness is a construct that is commonly employed in the social and health science lexicon and has gained increased popular acceptance through the advent of wellness centers and programs. Though it is agreed that wellness is multidimensional, previous conceptualizations and assessments of wellness vary in both number and type of dimensions as well as in the psychometric adequacy of the assessments. This study’s purpose was to improve the current state of the wellness research by demonstrating the reliability and validity of the newly developed Anschutz Wellness Evaluation 360 (AWE 360), a comprehensive assessment of wellness that includes seven dimensions: perceived wellness, stress, financial stress, occupational wellness, sleep quality, diet quality, and physical activity. Three samples (Sample 1: N = 427; Sample 2: N = 100; Sample 3: N = 1711) completed the AWE 360 scales as well as commonly used measures of relevant constructs. Analyses included exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, reliability analyses, and assessment of convergent and discriminant validity. After exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the final measure included eight scales. Reliability analyses indicated that the scales demonstrated adequate internal consistency. Correlational analyses provided early evidence for construct validity of the AWE 360. Results suggest the AWE 360 is an empirically supported measure with initial evidence for both reliability and validity. Future research should continue to explore the criterion validity and other psychometric properties of the AWE 360 as well as its practical ecological validity in applied and clinical settings.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Ella Chrenka for her assistance in running parallel analysis in R. We express our appreciation to the late Dr. Denise McGuire, whose contribution to this work was of great significance.

Funding

This research was supported by internal funds at the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center, University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Campus.

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Hooker, S.A., Masters, K.S., Ross, K.M. et al. Multiple Dimensions of Wellness: Development and Psychometric Properties of the Anschutz Wellness Evaluation 360 (AWE 360). J well-being assess 4, 95–119 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41543-020-00028-y

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Keywords

  • Well-being
  • Perceived wellness
  • Multidimensional
  • Reliability
  • Validity
  • Measurement