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Multisensory Facilitation of Working Memory Training

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Three additional tasks were administered (math test, countermanding task and matrix reasoning) that do not assess WM, and furthermore, some of the tasks were not consistent across conditions. Therefore, they were not included in the paper. Those tasks were included for pilot purposes in preparation for a larger scale study in which we are targeting 30,000 participants and a wide range of training conditions and outcome measurers (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/does-brain-training-actually-work/).

  2. 2.

    r is an effect size estimate calculated as z /√N

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Funding

This work has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (Grant No. 1R01MH111742) to ARS and SMJ, and by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. BCS-1057625) to ARS. In addition, SMJ is supported by the National Institute on Aging (Grant No. 1K02AG054665).

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Pahor, A., Collins, C., Smith-Peirce, R.N. et al. Multisensory Facilitation of Working Memory Training. J Cogn Enhanc 5, 386–395 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41465-020-00196-y

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