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Curriculum Perspectives

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 73–78 | Cite as

Education for climate change and a real-world curriculum

  • Angela Colliver
Point and Counterpoint

Abstract

What is education for climate change? How does the Australian Curriculum engage young people in education around climate change? These and other questions frame this article, which is based on a review of the Australian Curriculum version 7.5. The article will discuss the need for a more holistic and integrated approach to teaching and learning in all year levels, and one that embraces the use of the Australian Curriculum general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities when designing and implementing educational resources or learning programs about our changing climate.

Keywords

Curriculum Climate change Education for sustainability 

References

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Copyright information

© Australian Curriculum Studies Association 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Angela Colliver Consulting Services Pty Ltd (ACCS)WamboinAustralia

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