The Role of Rights-Based Social Work in Contemporary Latin American Diasporas: the Case of Venezuelan Migrant Children

Abstract

The scenario of international migration within Latin America has witnessed a turning point since the outbreak of the Venezuelan crisis in 2013, with children occupying an important percentage of these human displacements. Therefore, this paper focuses on the potential of rights-based social work in promoting the human rights of Venezuelan migrant children, exploring how social workers may help them overcome positions of rightlessness and increased vulnerability. This article provides a children’s rights-based approach for social workers who are directly involved in social work with migrant children. Even though the scope of analysis was directed to the experience of Venezuelan migrant children, this research can serve as an important source to guide social workers involved with child migrants in different social and geographical backgrounds.

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Acknowledgments

A sketch of this research paper was presented as a prerequisite for approval in the course “International Relations in Latin America,” which is a part of UNIVALI’s International Program. The course was administered by professor (MSc) Rodrigo Milindre Gonzalez; we would like to personally thank him. We also appreciate the comments and suggestions from the anonymous reviewers and the editorial team.

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Correspondence to Erick da Luz Scherf.

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Zanatta, M.d.L.A.L., da Luz Scherf, E. The Role of Rights-Based Social Work in Contemporary Latin American Diasporas: the Case of Venezuelan Migrant Children. J. Hum. Rights Soc. Work 4, 238–247 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41134-019-00104-1

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Keywords

  • Rights-based social work
  • Human rights
  • Child migration
  • Venezuelan children
  • Latin America