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Sleep education in Hong Kong

Abstract

Sleep is one of the basic human needs with a vital role in normal development and growth. However, sleep loss is a prevalent problem among school children and adolescents, leading to multiple academic and health consequences. Children and adolescents in Hong Kong who are under greater academic pressure and stress are found to sleep lesser than their western counterparts. Several local studies consistently demonstrated that Hong Kong schoolers are sleep deprived during school days with extensive sleep compensation during weekends. To combat this prevalent situation, sleep education program aiming at promoting healthy sleep practices is needed. This paper will review the rationale, efficacy and experiences of our large-scale school-based sleep education program in Hong Kong. In summary, our group conducted a clustered randomized school-based educational program with multilevel and multimodal sleep education program including town hall seminar, small class teachings, slogan and painting competitions and development of a sleep education website. The findings of our study conducted in the secondary schools suggested that school-based sleep education program was effective in increasing sleep knowledge, improving behaviors and psychological health as well as healthy lifestyle practice in adolescents, but it did not improve the sleep-wake pattern of the adolescents.

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Acknowledgments

The authors thank all the principals and teachers of the participating schools for approving and accommodating the implementation of the program. We also thank all the parents, teachers, and students who participated in the study.

Funding source: This project was supported by Public Policy Research of University Grants Committee (Reference Number: CUHK4012-PPR-11), Hong Kong SAR, China. The funding body has no role in conception, design, conduction, interpretation and analysis of the study or in the approval of the publication.

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Correspondence to Yun Kwok Wing.

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Chan, N.Y., Lam, S.P., Zhang, J. et al. Sleep education in Hong Kong. Sleep Biol. Rhythms 14, 21–25 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41105-015-0008-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s41105-015-0008-8

Keywords

  • Sleep deprivation
  • Sleep education
  • Efficacy
  • Feasibility