Skip to main content

Carbon dioxide sequestration capability of hazelnut orchards: daily and seasonal trends

Abstract

Under the current global warming scenario, with temperatures expected to reach 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels between 2030 and 2052, the role of terrestrial ecosystems’ vegetation in removing carbon (C) from the atmosphere takes on even more importance. In particular, there is a need for researchers to emphasize and further quantify the environmental role of vegetation types such as agro-ecosystems. Woody crops like orchards typically dominate the landscape and the rural economy in producing areas of the Mediterranean region. In this context, the present study aimed to quantify the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestered by one of the most important tree crop species widely diffused across the Mediterranean region: Corylus avellana L. (hazelnut). Overall, the results highlighted that the hazelnut orchards under consideration, subjected to routine horticultural care, sequestered a total amount of CO2 of 58.8 ± 9.1 Mg ha−1 year−1 (mean value), with the highest amount of CO2 sequestered recorded in May (12.4 ± 2.0 Mg CO2 ha−1 month−1). Considering also that the area covered by hazelnut cultivation is continuously increasing, we can conclude that this cultivation is important not only for the orchards’ nut production but also for their role as carbon sinks.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
Fig. 6
Fig. 7

References

  1. Aguilera E, Guzmán G, Alonso A (2015) Greenhouse gas emissions from conventional and organic cropping systems in Spain. II. Fruit tree orchards. Agron Sustain Dev 35:725–737

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Auzmendi I, Mata M, Lopez G, Girona J, Marsal J (2011) Intercepted radiation by apple canopy can be used as a basis for irrigation scheduling. Agric Water Manag 98(5):886–892

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Bassil NV, Botta R, Mehlenbacher SA (2005) Microsatellite markers in Hazelnut: isolation, characterization, and cross-species amplification. J Am Soc Hort Sci 130(4):543–549

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Beedlow PA, Tingey DT, Phillips DL, Hogsett WE, Olszyk DM (2004) Rising atmospheric CO2 and carbon sequestration in forests. Front Ecol Environ 2:315–322

    Google Scholar 

  5. Bignami C, Cristofori V, Ghini P, Rugini E (2009) Effects of irrigation on growth and yield components of hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) in Central Italy. Acta Hort 845:309–314

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Catoni R, Gratani L, Bracco F, Granata MU (2017) How water supply during leaf development drives water stress response in Corylus avellana saplings. Sci Hort 214:122–132

    Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Chaves M, Pereira J, Maroco J, Rodrigues MI, Ricardo CPP et al (2002) How plants cope with water stress in the field. Photosynthesis and field growth. Ann Bot 89:907–916

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Cristofori V, Cammilli C, Valentini B, Bignami C (2009) Effect of different pruning methods on growth, yield and quality of the hazelnut cultivar Tonda Gentile Romana. Acta Hort 845:315–322

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Dunn S (2002) Reading the Weathervane: climate policy from Rio to Johannesburg. World watch Paper No. 160, Washington, World watch Institute

  10. FAO Production Yearbook (2016) http://faostat.fao.org/site/339/default.aspx

  11. Fragoso-López PI, Rodríguez-Laguna R, Otazo-Sánchez EM, González-Ramírez CA, Valdéz-Lazalde JR et al (2017) Carbon sequestration in protected areas: a case study of an Abies religiosa (H.B.K.) Schlecht. et Cham forest. Forests 8:429

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Giorgi F, Lionello P (2008) Climate change projections for the Mediterranean region. Global Planet Change 63:90–104

    Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Gorte RW (2009) Carbon sequestration in forests. In: Congressional Res. Serv. Rep. for Congress, USA

  14. Granata MU, Gratani L, Bracco F, Sartori F, Catoni R (2016) Carbon stock estimation in an unmanaged old-growth forest: a case study from a broad-leaf deciduous forest in the northwest of Italy. Int For Rev 18:444–451

    Google Scholar 

  15. Granata MU, Gratani L, Bracco F, Catoni R (2019) Carbon dioxide sequestration capability of an unmanaged old-growth broadleaf deciduous forest in a Strict Nature Reserve. J Sustain For 38:85–89

    Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Gratani L, Varone L (2006) Carbon sequestration by Quercus ilex L. and Quercus pubescens Willd. and their contribution to decreasing air temperature in Rome. Urban Ecosyst 9:27–37

    Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Gratani L, Catoni R, Varone L (2011) Quercus ilex L. carbon sequestration capability related to shrub size. Environ Monit Assess 178:383–392

    Article  Google Scholar 

  18. Gratani L, Crescente MF, Varone L, Puglielli G, Catoni R, Bonito A (2017) Carbon storage by Mediterranean vegetation developing inside a protected area. Rendiconti Lincei 28(2):425–433

    Article  Google Scholar 

  19. Gratani L, Di Martino L, Frattaroli AR, Bonito A, Di Cecco V et al (2018) Carbon sequestration capability of Fagus sylvatica forests developing in the Majella National Park (Central Apennines, Italy). J For Res 29(6):1627–1634

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Hampson CR, Azarenko AN, Potter JR (1996) Photosynthetic rate, flowering, and yield component alteration in hazelnut in response to different light environments. J Am Soc Hort Sci 121(6):1103–1111

    Article  Google Scholar 

  21. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2006) Guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories. In: Agriculture, forestry and other land use, vol 4. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Japan

  22. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2018) Summary for Policymakers. In: Allen M, Babiker M, Chen Y, de Coninck H, Connors S et al. (ed) Global Warming of 1.5°C. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III of the IPCC to the 48th Session of the IPCC, Incheon, Republic of Korea, 6 Oct 2018

  23. Istituto Nazionale di Statistica (Istat). Istat.it, Agricultura e Zootecnia, coltivazioni legnose: frutta fresca,TavC19,2018, http://agri.istat.it/jsp/dawinci.jsp?q=plC190000010000012000&an=2017&ig=1&ct=270&id=8A|15A|21A|2A|30A

  24. Knohl A, Schulze E-D, Kolle O, Buchmann N (2003) Large carbon uptake by an unmanaged 250-year-old deciduous forest in Central Germany. Agr For Met 118:151–167

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Luyssaert S, Inglima I, Jung M, Richardson AD, Reichstein M, Papale D, Piao SL, Schulze ED, Wingate L, Matteucci G, Aragao L, Aubinet M, Beer C, Bernhofer C, Black KG, Bonal D, Bonnefond JM, Chambers J, Ciais P, Cook B, Davis KJ, Dolman AJ, Gielen B, Goulden M, Grace J, Granier A, Grelle A, Griffis T, Grunwald T, Guidolotti G, Hanson PJ, Harding Hollinger DY, Hutyra LR, Kolari P, Kruijt B, Kutsch W, Lagergren F, Laurila T (2007) CO2 balance of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests derived from a global database. Global Change Biol 13:2509–2537

    Article  Google Scholar 

  26. Marchetti M, Sallustio L, Ottaviano M, Barbati A, Corona P et al (2012) Carbon sequestration by forests in the National Parks of Italy. Plant Biosyst 46(4):1001–1011

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Medrano H, Escalona JM, Bota J, Gulias J, Flexas J (2002) Regulation of photosynthesis in C3 plants in response to progressive drought. Stomatal conductance as a references parameters. Ann Bot 89:895–905

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Montagnini F, Nair PKR (2004) Carbon sequestration: an underexploited environmental benefit of agroforestry systems. Agric Syst 61:281–295

    Google Scholar 

  29. Nayeri M, Firouzan AH, Azarpour E (2014) Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Hazelnut Production in Forest North of Iran. Adv Environ Biol 8(24):289–292

    Google Scholar 

  30. Nowak DJ, Hirabayashi S, Bodine A, Hoehn R (2013) Modeled PM2.5 removal by trees in ten U.S. cities and associated health effects. Environ Pollut 178:395–402

    Article  Google Scholar 

  31. PBL, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (2013) Trends in global CO2 emissions. 2013. Report

  32. Pergola M, Persiani A, Pastore V, Palese AM, Arous A, Celano G (2017) A comprehensive Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of three apricot orchard systems located in Metapontino area (Southern Italy). J Clean Prod 142:4059–4071

    Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Reich PB, Kloeppel BD, Ellsworth DS, Walters MB (1995) Different photosynthesis–nitrogen relations in deciduous hardwood and evergreen coniferous tree species. Oecologia 104:24–30

    Article  Google Scholar 

  34. Running S-W, Coughlan J (1988) A general model of forest ecosystem processes for regional applications. I. Hydrologic balance, canopy gas exchange, canopy gas exchange and primary production processes. Ecol Model 42:125–154

    Article  Google Scholar 

  35. Scandellari F, Caruso G, Liguori G, Meggio F, Palese Assunta M, Zanotelli D, Celano G, Gucci R, Inglese P, Pitacco A, Tagliavini M (2016) A survey of carbon sequestration potential of orchards and vineyards in Italy. Eur J Hortic Sci 81(2):106–114

    Article  Google Scholar 

  36. Semwal RL, Nautiyal S, Maikhuri RK, Rao KS, Saxena KG (2013) Growth and carbon stocks of multipurpose tree species plantations in degraded lands in central Himalaya, India. For Ecol Manag 310:450–459

    Article  Google Scholar 

  37. Sofo A, Nuzzo V, Palese AM, Xiloyannis C, Celano G et al (2005) Net CO2 storage in Mediterranean olive and peach orchards. Sci Hort 107:17–24

    Article  Google Scholar 

  38. Somogyi Z, Teobaldelli M, Federici S, Matteucci G, Pagliari V et al (2008) Allometric biomass and carbon factors database. iforest-Biogeosciences and Forestry 1:107–113

    Article  Google Scholar 

  39. Takimoto A, Ramachandran Nair PK, Nair VD (2008) Carbon stock and sequestration potential of traditional and improved agroforestry systems in the West African Sahel. Agr Ecosyst Environ 125:159–166

    Article  Google Scholar 

  40. UNFCCC (1997) Kyoto protocol to the United Nation Framework Convention on climate change. http://unfccc.int/

  41. Wu T, Wang Y, Yu C, Chiarawipa R, Zhang X et al (2012) Carbon sequestration by fruit trees—chinese apple orchards as an example. PLoS ONE 7(6):e38883. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0038883

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the “Natural Reserve Bosco Siro Negri” funded by the Ministry of the Environmental and Protection of land and Sea of Italy. We acknowledge the anonymous reviewers for detailed comments having contributed to improve this manuscript.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rosangela Catoni.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Informed consent

The authors give informed consent.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Granata, M.U., Bracco, F. & Catoni, R. Carbon dioxide sequestration capability of hazelnut orchards: daily and seasonal trends. Energ. Ecol. Environ. 5, 153–160 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40974-020-00161-7

Download citation

Keywords

  • Hazelnut orchards
  • Carbon sequestration
  • Net photosynthesis
  • Leaf area index
  • Pruning practices