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Dialectics of nature in materials science: binary cooperative complementary materials

材料科学中的自然辩证法: 二元协同材料

Abstract

Binary cooperative complementary materials, consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel principle for the design and construct of functional materials. By summarizing recent achievement in materials science, it can be found that the cooperative interaction distance between the pair of complementary property must be comparable with the scale of related physical or chemical parameter. When the binary components are in the cooperative distance, the cooperation between these building blocks becomes dominant and endows the macroscopic materials with unique properties and advanced functionalities that cannot be achieved by either of building blocks.

摘要

“二元协同材料”这一新概念,不同于传统的单一体相材料,是在材料的宏观表面或体相内建造二元协同纳米界面结构. 该材料设计原理是,在介观尺度引入不同甚至完全相反理化性质的纳米微区,在某种条件下具有协同的相互作用, 以致在宏观上呈现出超常规物性的材料.这一新原理的关键是找出这两种组分间的协同距离, 该协同距离应该与物理或化学中的某一特征常数相关.这一设计原理可以拓展到材料科学的多个领域, 用于指导制备各种新型功能材料.

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Correspondence to Lei Jiang.

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Mingjie Liu is a professor at Beihang University. He received his BSc degree in applied chemistry (2005) from Beijing University of Chemical Technology. In 2005, he joined Prof. Lei Jiang’s group and received PhD degree from the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in 2010. He then worked as a postdoctor in Prof. Takuzo Aida’s group in Riken in Japan from 2010 to 2015. In 2015, he got the “1000 Youth Plan Program” and joined BeihangUniversity. His current research interests focus on hydrogel/organogel surfaceswith super-wettability, bio-inspired hydrogels with special mechanical strength, anisotropic soft matter with aligned structures.

Lei Jiang received his BSc degree in solid state physics (1987), and MSc degree in physical chemistry (1990) from Jilin University in China. From 1992 to 1994, he studied at the University of Tokyo in Japan as a China-Japan joint course PhD student and received his PhD degree from Jilin University of China with Prof. Tiejin Li. Then, he worked as a postdoctoral fellow in Prof. Akira Fujishima’s group at the University of Tokyo. In 1996, he worked as researcher in Kanagawa Academy of Sciences and Technology, Prof. Hashimoto’s project. In 1999, he joined the Institute of Chemistry, CAS. In 2015, he moved to the Technoligical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, CAS. Since 2008, he also served as the dean of School of Chemistry and Environment in Beihang University. He was elected as members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and The World Academy of Sciences in 2009 and 2012. In 2016, he was also elected as a foreign member of the US National Academy of Engineering. His research is focused on bioinspired, smart, multi-scale surfaces with super-wettability and his publications have been cited more than 36000 times with an H-index of 89.

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Liu, M., Jiang, L. Dialectics of nature in materials science: binary cooperative complementary materials. Sci. China Mater. 59, 239–246 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40843-016-5051-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40843-016-5051-6

Keywords

  • dialectics of nature
  • binary cooperative complementary materials
  • cooperative interaction distance
  • material design