Journal of Pediatric Neuropsychology

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 68–78

Neuropsychological Aspects of Prevention and Intervention for FASD in South Africa

  • Wendy O. Kalberg
  • Anna-Susan Marais
  • Marlene M. De Vries
  • Soraya Seedat
  • Charles Parry
  • Philip A. May
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s40817-017-0035-2

Cite this article as:
Kalberg, W.O., Marais, AS., De Vries, M.M. et al. J Pediatr Neuropsychol (2017) 3: 68. doi:10.1007/s40817-017-0035-2

Abstract

Twenty years of collaborative epidemiology research in South Africa have revealed the highest reported rates of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the world. The FASD research in South Africa has now expanded beyond prevalence research to maternal risk factor studies, longitudinal development studies, brain imaging studies, school intervention studies, and comprehensive prevention studies. The burden presented by the high numbers of affected individuals in South Africa is significant and a call to action is needed. This paper will outline the prevalence of FASD, review the South African governmental responses to the problem, report on the FASD research that has been completed, describe the prevention and intervention efforts that have been implemented, and outline how pediatric neuropsychologists and school psychologists can work with stakeholders to improve the lives of affected individuals and their families.

Keywords

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders South Africa Fetal alcohol syndrome Review of research Neuropsychologist Prevalence 

Copyright information

© American Academy of Pediatric Neuropsychology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy O. Kalberg
    • 1
  • Anna-Susan Marais
    • 2
  • Marlene M. De Vries
    • 2
  • Soraya Seedat
    • 2
  • Charles Parry
    • 2
    • 3
  • Philip A. May
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.The University of New Mexico, Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and AddictionsAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of Medicine and Health SciencesStellenbosch UniversityCape TownSouth Africa
  3. 3.South African Medical Research CouncilCape TownSouth Africa
  4. 4.The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Nutrition Research InstituteKannapolisUSA

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