Modeling the effect of global warming on the spread of carrier dependent infectious diseases

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Abstract

In this paper a non-linear model is proposed and analyzed to study the effect of global warming temperature on the spread of carrier dependent infectious diseases in the habitat. In the modeling process, five dependent variables are considered, namely, the density of susceptible population, the density of infective population, the density of carrier population, the concentration of CO2 emitted from both natural as well as human population related activities and the global warming temperature. The non-linear model is analyzed by using the stability theory of differential equations and numerical simulation. The analysis shows that as the global warming temperature increases, not only the carrier population density increases but also the number of infectives in the population increases, leading to fast spread of the infectious diseases. The numerical simulation confirms the analytical results.

Keywords

Global warming temperature Carbon dioxide CO2 Carrier population Infectious diseases Mathematical modeling 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Shikha Singh is thankful to Professor J B Shukla, Vice Chancellor (Hon.) International Internet University for Research, Kanpur and President, Indian Academy of Mathematical Modelling and Simulation, for his useful suggestions.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics, PPN CollegeCSJM UniversityKanpurIndia

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