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Experimental Techniques

, Volume 42, Issue 2, pp 155–176 | Cite as

Impact of Ceramic Substrates Geometry on the Performance of Simple Thermo-Acoustic Engines

  • L. K. Tartibu
Article

Abstract

This work experimentally examines the influence of the stack geometry and position on the performance of thermo-acoustic engines (TAE). Twenty cordierite honeycomb ceramic stacks with square pores and five different lengths (7, 13, 17, 22 and 25 mm) were considered. Measurements were taken at seven different locations of the stack hot ends from the pressure antinode (closed end), namely 52, 72, 92,112, 132, 152 and 172 mm respectively. The temperature difference across the stack and radiated sound pressure level at steady state are considered indicators of the performance of the device. The results obtained with a simple standing wave thermo-acoustic engine used in this experiment reveals that the relationships between the length, the stack pores sizes and the input power are non-linear. In addition, the effect of the viscous resistance and the thermal losses were confirmed to be strong enough when the input heating power is low.

Keywords

Thermo-acoustic engine Ceramic substrate Stack Thermal losses 

Nomenclature

Abbreviations

CPSI

Cells Per Square Inch

DAQ

Data Acquisition

dB

decibels

FFT

Fast Fourier Transform

SPL

Sound pressure level

TAE

Thermo-acoustic engine

TAR

Thermo-acoustic refrigerator

Symbols

BR

Blockage ratio

c

Speed of sound [m s-1]

cp

Isobaric specific heat [J/kgK]

d

Channel dimension [m]

h

Heat transfer coefficient [W/m2K]

H

Stack height or radius [m]

K

Thermal conductivity [W/mK]

kB

Boltzmann constant

kzz

Axial thermal conductivity [W/mK]

L

Stack length [m]

N

Number of channels

p

Pressure [Pa]

\( \overset{\cdot }{Q} \)

Heat flux [W]

RV

Viscous resistance [kg/m4s]

TC

Cold end temperature [K]

TH

Hot end temperature [K]

T

Temperature of the surroundings [K]

u

Velocity [m s-1]

X

Axial distance [m]

W

Acoustic work [W]

δk

Gas thermal penetration depth [m]

δv

Viscous penetration depth [m]

ε

Surface emissivity

γ

Isentropic coefficient

Γ

Temperature gradient ratio

μ

Dynamic viscosity [kg/m s]

ω

Angular frequency [rad/s]

ρ

Density [kg/m3]

T

Temperature gradient [K/m]

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Research office of Mangosuthu University of Technology, the department of Mechanical Engineering of Cape Peninsula University of Technology and the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering TechnologyUniversity of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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