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Biosensing Technologies for Medical Applications, Manufacturing, and Regenerative Medicine

Abstract

Purpose of Review

The review covers biosensing technologies, their impact on healthcare, and future applications.

Recent Findings

Advancements in biosensing technologies that can detect a wide range of bioanalytes at reduced costs are described.

Summary

Biosensing technologies are becoming essential for advancing human healthcare. A biosensor detects a specific biological analyte and monitors its function within a biological milieu; this technology has gained the attention of many researchers worldwide owing to its importance in medical applications. Noninvasive, cost-effective, high-resolution, and portable biosensors can be extensively utilized; however, there remain numerous challenges to overcome, including real-time, in vivo monitoring of organ functionality in high-risk patients. Herein, we review biosensors, their fabrication, and their various uses. Additionally, we provide an overview of their role in medical applications such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, wound healing, cancer diagnosis, and prosthesis fabrication. Furthermore, the applications of biosensing technologies in regenerative medicine such as biomanufacturing procedures, organ-on-a-chip technologies, and indicators of therapeutic efficacy are discussed. Finally, an overall perspective of the field and its potential future directions are considered.

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Correspondence to Ashkan Shafiee.

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Ashkan Shafiee, Elham Ghadiri, Jareer Kassis, Nima Pourhabibi Zarandi, and Anthony Atala declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Shafiee, A., Ghadiri, E., Kassis, J. et al. Biosensing Technologies for Medical Applications, Manufacturing, and Regenerative Medicine. Curr Stem Cell Rep 4, 105–115 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40778-018-0123-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40778-018-0123-y

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Noninvasive
  • Biomanufacturing
  • Biomonitoring
  • Therapeutic efficacy