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A Bayesian Meta-Analysis on the Association Between Beta-Carotene and Bone Mineral Density

Abstract

The results of epidemiological studies on the association between dietary β-carotene and bone mineral density (BMD) are remaining controversial. This study aimed to investigate the association between dietary β-carotene and BMD using a Bayesian meta-analysis approach. We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register, and Medline databases up to July 2019. Two authors independently screened articles, identified, and assessed the risk of bias. Bayesian hierarchical random effect models were used to synthesize data from individual studies. Five studies that consisted of three cross-sectional studies and two cohort studies involving 12,521 men and women met the inclusion criteria. Overall, dietary β-carotene reduced loss of BMD (risk ratio (RR) 0.89; 95% credible interval (CrI) 0.77–0.99). The probability of that β-carotene dietary reduced loss of BMD was 0.99. Sensitivity analyses indicate that approximately similar findings were observed across different prior information. We suggested that dietary intakes of β-carotene was associated with reduced the loss of bone mineral density for the general population. Further research will be recommended to confirm our findings.

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Acknowledgements

Concept and study design: TGC. Data searching and collection: TGC and KSO. Data analysis: TGC. Interpretation of the results: TGC and KSO. Drafting manuscript: TGC and KSO. Revising manuscript content: TGC and KSO. Both authors approved the final version of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Tesfaye Getachew Charkos.

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Charkos, T.G., Oumer, K.S. A Bayesian Meta-Analysis on the Association Between Beta-Carotene and Bone Mineral Density. Ann. Data. Sci. 9, 315–325 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40745-020-00257-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40745-020-00257-1

Keywords

  • Vitamin A
  • β-carotene
  • Bone mineral density
  • Bayesian
  • Meta-analysis