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Family Caregivers’ Concerns and Expectations From a Long-Stay Residential Facility for Persons with Mental Illness: Experience From Richmond Fellowship Society (I), Bangalore Branch

Abstract

Some family caregivers of persons with mental illness have a felt need for long-term residential facilities. Richmond Fellowship Society (I), (RFS) Bangalore Branch has been running 'Jyothi,' a long-stay residential facility for the last 25 years (1995–2020). This paper aims to understand the family caregivers' concerns and expectations from Jyothi. Sixteen family caregivers whose family members are availing of Jyothi services were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule developed for the study. The caregiver burden persuaded families to ask for a long-stay residential facility. Though unhappy at the idea of shifting to a long-stay facility, most clients accepted it due to the then prevailing circumstances. Family caregivers' expectations include catering to basic requirements, health care needs, activity scheduling, and socialization. A few family caregivers were not sure if the long-stay facility can cater to emotional needs. The family caregivers look for a 'home away from home’ for their clients. The decision to admit to Jyothi and ongoing care involved only close or extended family members. Despite being a long-stay facility, families are closely involved in the care of the clients. More such studies are needed to understand families' need for long-stay residential facilities for persons with mental illness, especially those from lower socioeconomic status, fees they can afford, and expected services.

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Correspondence to Thanapal Sivakumar.

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Appendices

Appendix 1

See Table

Table 3 Socio-Demographic Details

3

Appendix 2

Interview Schedule

  1. 1.

    Who broached the idea of a long-stay residential facility?

  2. 2.

    What other options did you explore?

  3. 3.

    Why did you consider a long-stay residential facility?

  4. 4.

    What was the expectation of family caregivers from the long-stay residential facility?

  5. 5.

    What was your ward's reaction when you informed them about your decision to consider a long-stay residential facility?

  6. 6.

    Before admitting your ward in Jyothi House, what concerns did you have about the long-stay residential facility?

  7. 7.

    How many years after your ward's illness did you consider admission to a long-stay residential facility?

  8. 8.

    How do you feel the long-stay residential facility has helped your ward?

  9. 9.

    Did your other family members support your decision to admit your ward to a long-stay residential facility?

  10. 10.

    Over the last 1 year, how many times have you/ your family visited your ward in Jyothi House?

  11. 11.

    Over the last 1 year, how many times has your ward visited your family?

  12. 12.

    Who paid for the monthly fees and the refundable deposit?

  13. 13.

    Did you feel the long-stay residential facility would be able to provide your ward with the following needs?

    1. a.

      Basic Needs

    2. b.

      Medication adherence

    3. c.

      Emotional Needs

    4. d.

      Physical Needs

    5. e.

      Any Other

  14. 14.

    On a scale from 1–10, how far do you feel your wards need have been met?

    1. a.

      Basic Needs

    2. b.

      Medication adherence

    3. c.

      Emotional Needs

    4. d.

      Physical Needs

    5. e.

      Others

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D’Souza, C.A., Sivakumar, T., Kalyanasundaram, S. et al. Family Caregivers’ Concerns and Expectations From a Long-Stay Residential Facility for Persons with Mental Illness: Experience From Richmond Fellowship Society (I), Bangalore Branch. J. Psychosoc. Rehabil. Ment. Health (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40737-021-00238-4

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Keywords

  • Family caregivers
  • Long-stay residential facility
  • Supported accommodation
  • Severe mental illness
  • Rehabilitation
  • India