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Assessing and Training Young Children in Same and Different Relations Using the Relational Evaluation Procedure (REP)

An Erratum to this article was published on 23 August 2016

Abstract

Previous research suggests the relational evaluation procedure (REP) is a useful means by which to assess and train relational responding. Most work so far has been with adults; however, given the potential utility of the REP for assessing and training relational responding, researchers need to investigate its use with young children. The current series of studies presents relevant data. Study 1 shows correlations between performance on a simple REP-based multi-level protocol (the NSD-REP) and cognitive and linguistic ability in a relatively large (n = 26) sample of typically developing children (aged 2–5). Studies 2–4 involved training REP performance to criterion in a number of these children, using a multiple baseline design across participants in each case to show experimental control. These findings supplement previous data suggesting the utility of the REP for training relational responding in young children.

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Correspondence to Ian Stewart.

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Conflict of Interest

The first author declares that she has no conflict of interest. The second author declares that he has no conflict of interest. The third author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Additional information

An erratum to this article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40732-016-0199-7.

Appendix 1

Appendix 1

Table

Table 3 Vocal response targets and antecedent stimuli presented under tact conditions for a representative participant

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Hayes, J., Stewart, I. & McElwee, J. Assessing and Training Young Children in Same and Different Relations Using the Relational Evaluation Procedure (REP). Psychol Rec 66, 547–561 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40732-016-0191-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40732-016-0191-2

Keywords

  • Relational frame theory (RFT)
  • Relational evaluation procedure (REP)
  • Children
  • Assessment
  • Training
  • Multiple baseline design