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Changes in Organ Physiology in the Aging Adult

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Recent advances in geriatric medicine and the aging of organ physiology affect the available clinical understanding and treatments for geriatric trauma patients.

Recent Findings

The effects of aging on organ physiology are complex and interlinked. There are global cellular changes and molecular and cellular changes specific to individual organ systems that affect the host response to trauma in the elderly.

Summary

As a n improved understanding of the physiologic changes of aging at the organ level allows application to a variety of clinical scenarios; we have better understanding of the host response to trauma at an older age.

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References

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Correspondence to Stephanie L. Bonne.

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Drs. Bonne and Livingston declare no conflicts of interest relevant to this manuscript.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Geriatric Trauma

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Bonne, S.L., Livingston, D.H. Changes in Organ Physiology in the Aging Adult. Curr Trauma Rep 3, 8–12 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40719-016-0069-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40719-016-0069-4

Keywords

  • Geriatric trauma
  • Organ physiology
  • Aging adult