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The School Psychologist’s Role in Leading Multidisciplinary School-Based Threat Assessment Teams

Abstract

School psychologists have long been regarded for their expertise in the assessment, evaluation, and delivery of mental and behavioral health services for children in schools. Given the growing attention to school safety, crisis prevention, and crisis intervention, school psychologists are also increasingly called upon to assist with systems-level prevention efforts and individual assessments of risk for targeted violence through participation in school-based threat assessments. In this article, I define the role of the school psychologist within the multidisciplinary threat assessment team in conducting comprehensive assessments and developing individualized interventions to mitigate threats of violence in schools. From my experience conducting threat assessments as a school psychologist, implications for schools, school-based practitioners, and university trainers are also explored.

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Correspondence to Shawna Rader Kelly.

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Kelly, S.R. The School Psychologist’s Role in Leading Multidisciplinary School-Based Threat Assessment Teams. Contemp School Psychol 22, 163–173 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40688-017-0153-y

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Keywords

  • Threat assessment
  • School safety
  • Crisis prevention
  • Crisis intervention