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School-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for an Adolescent Presenting with ADHD and Explosive Anger: a Case Study

Abstract

This case demonstrates the efficacy of utilizing an intensive, multi-faceted behavioral intervention paradigm. A comprehensive, integrative, school-based service model was applied to address attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptomology, oppositional behaviors, and explosive anger at the secondary level. The case reviews a multi-modal assessment approach to inform intervention, including a developmental history; parent, teacher, and student interviews; systematic classroom observations; and BASC-2 and Conners parent, teacher, and student social, emotional, and behavior rating reports. Treatment included cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions over 6 months with the implementation of a 9-week classroom Daily Behavior Report Card plan. Outcome data revealed a decrease in office discipline referrals, lower levels of behavior symptoms, and an increase in prosocial classroom behaviors with maintained improvement into the following school year.

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Correspondence to Janise Parker.

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Parker, J., Zaboski, B. & Joyce-Beaulieu, D. School-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for an Adolescent Presenting with ADHD and Explosive Anger: a Case Study. Contemp School Psychol 20, 356–369 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40688-016-0093-y

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Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • ADHD
  • Oppositional defiant disorder
  • ODD
  • Behavior intervention plan
  • BIP
  • Secondary school
  • MTSS
  • RtI