Cultural Betrayal as a Dimension of Traumatic Harm: Violence and PTSS among Ethnic Minority Emerging Adults

Abstract

According to cultural betrayal trauma theory, within-group violence confers a cultural betrayal that contributes to outcomes, including symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSS). Close relationship with the perpetrator, known as high betrayal, also impacts PTSS. The purpose of the current study is to examine cultural betrayal trauma, high betrayal trauma, and PTSS in a sample of diverse ethnic minority emerging adults. Participants (N = 296) completed the one-hour questionnaire online. Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that when controlling for gender, ethnicity, and interracial trauma, high betrayal trauma and cultural betrayal trauma were associated with PTSS. Clinical interventions can include assessments of the relationship with and in-group status of the perpetrator(s) in order to guide treatment planning with diverse survivors.

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Gómez, J.M. Cultural Betrayal as a Dimension of Traumatic Harm: Violence and PTSS among Ethnic Minority Emerging Adults. Journ Child Adol Trauma (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40653-020-00314-0

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Keywords

  • PTSD
  • Abuse
  • Cultural betrayal trauma theory
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Emerging adulthood