Allergo Journal International

, Volume 25, Issue 5, pp 131–137

Weather conditions and climate change have an effect on allergies

Review

DOI: 10.1007/s40629-016-0119-z

Cite this article as:
Bergmann, KC. Allergo J Int (2016) 25: 131. doi:10.1007/s40629-016-0119-z

Key words

climate change pollen ragweed molds thunderstorm-related asthma 

Abbrevations

AR

Assessment report

CO2

Carbon dioxide

Ig

Immunoglobulin

IPCC

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

PID

German Pollen Information Service

PM

Particulate matter

WAO

World Allergy Organization

Abstract

Climate change particularly affects the health of vulnerable groups, such as children, the elderly, and socially disadvantaged individuals. Asthmatics are also at greater risk from the results of climate change due to their non-specific and allergen-specific bronchial hyperreactivity. Climate change affects the production, release, and number of allergenic pollens throughout Europe. Tree pollen in particular is being seen earlier and in greater numbers, while little effect is seen on grass pollens, and mugwort pollen is showing a downward trend. The ragweed that is spreading throughout Europe is still only of regional relevance in Germany. Thunderstorm periods represent a risk for pollen asthmatics. Although little is known about changes in molds, an increase in mycelium growth and spore formation is anticipated. Warmer winters may result in changes to mite populations.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Allergy-Centre-CharitéCharité-Universitätsmedizin BerlinBerlinGermany

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