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Nutritional therapy in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

Abstract

CKD-related nutritional therapy (NT) is a crucial cornerstone of CKD patients’ treatment, but the role of NT has not been clearly investigated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Several clinical studies have focused on new pharmacological approaches to delay cystic disease progression, but there are no data on dietary interventions in ADPKD patients. The aim of this paper is to analyze the evidence from the literature on the impact of five nutritional aspects (water, sodium, phosphorus, protein intake, and net acid load) in CKD-related ADPKD extrapolating—where information is unavailable—from what occurs in CKD non-ADPKD patients Sodium intake restriction could be useful in decreasing the growth rate of cysts. Although further evidence is needed, restriction of phosphorus and protein intake restriction represent cornerstones of the dietary support of renal non-ADPKD patients and common sense can guide their use. It could be also helpful to limit animal protein, increasing fruit and vegetables intake together with a full correction of metabolic acidosis. Finally, fluid intake may be recommended in the early stages of the disease, although it is not to be prescribed in the presence of moderate to severe reduction of renal function.

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Correspondence to Biagio R. Di Iorio.

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All procedures performed in this study were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Di Iorio, B.R., Cupisti, A., D’Alessandro, C. et al. Nutritional therapy in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. J Nephrol 31, 635–643 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40620-018-0470-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40620-018-0470-x

Keywords

  • ADPKD
  • CKD
  • Nutritional therapy
  • Fluid intake
  • Sodium intake
  • Protein intake
  • Phosphorus intake
  • Metabolic acidosis