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Habitual physical activity is associated with improved anthropometric and androgenic profile in PCOS: a cross-sectional study

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the effect of habitual physical activity (PA) on the metabolic and hormonal profiles of women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Materials and methods

Anthropometric, metabolic and hormonal assessment and determination of habitual PA levels with a digital pedometer were evaluated in 84 women with PCOS and 67 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls. PA status was defined according to number of steps (≥7500 steps, active, or <7500 steps, sedentary).

Results

BMI was lower in active women from both groups. Active PCOS women presented lower waist circumference (WC) and lipid accumulation product (LAP) values versus sedentary PCOS women. In the control group, active women also had lower WC, lower values for fasting and 120-min insulin, and lower LAP than sedentary controls. In the PCOS group, androgen levels were lower in active versus sedentary women (p = 0.001). In the control group, free androgen index (FAI) was also lower in active versus sedentary women (p = 0.018). Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and 2000 daily step increments were independent predictors of FAI. Each 2000 daily step increment was associated with a decrease of 1.07 in FAI.

Conclusions

Habitual PA was associated with a better anthropometric and androgenic profile in PCOS.

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Fig. 1

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Grants from Brazilian National Institute of Hormones and Women’s Health/Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq INCT 573747/20083), Brazil. The funding sources had no influence in the writing or decision to submit the article for publication.

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Correspondence to P. M. Spritzer.

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All procedures performed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Informed consent for the scientific use of the data was obtained from all participants included in the study.

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Mario, F.M., Graff, S.K. & Spritzer, P.M. Habitual physical activity is associated with improved anthropometric and androgenic profile in PCOS: a cross-sectional study. J Endocrinol Invest 40, 377–384 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40618-016-0570-1

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Keywords

  • Androgens
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Exercise
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome