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Evaluating the Effects of Technology-Based Self-Monitoring on Positive Staff–Consumer Interactions in Group Homes

Abstract

The quality and frequency of positive interactions between staff and consumers are related to reductions in consumer problem behavior and increases in other desired outcomes, such as leisure and self-help skills. Unfortunately, the frequency with which group home staff positively interact with consumers is often low and regularly requires intervention. We evaluated the effects of technology-based self-monitoring on positive interactions between staff and consumers during consumer leisure time. Participant data were collected off-site through video recordings from cameras already present in the group homes. During baseline, participant interactions were low. Upon introduction of an intervention containing self-monitoring completed via a tablet device, staff interactions increased and maintained when the intervention was in effect. Supplemental feedback via text message was provided to two of the three participants to reach criterion. These findings demonstrate the utility of technology-based self-monitoring for some individuals to increase positive staff–consumer interactions in group homes.

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Fig. 1

Notes

  1. 1.

    At the beginning of the day, participants were contacted via text message to confirm they would be in the home and available to self-monitor.

  2. 2.

    We did not record frequency per interval; we used partial-interval recording.

  3. 3.

    Although the primary dependent measure involved 5-min intervals, data collectors scored behavior in 1-min intervals. Thus, the agreement percentages were calculated using 1-min intervals.

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Correspondence to Florence D. DiGennaro Reed.

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The first author does not have a conflict of interest. The second author serves on the Board of Directors for the organization where the research was conducted. The second author did not interact directly with participants.

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The study was approved both by the University IRB and the organization’s Human Rights Committee where the research was conducted.

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This study was conducted by the first author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. in behavior analysis at the University of Kansas. The authors thank Maranda J. Scheller, Andrew Widener, and Allie Heiner for their contributions to this project.

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Ruby, S.A., DiGennaro Reed, F.D. Evaluating the Effects of Technology-Based Self-Monitoring on Positive Staff–Consumer Interactions in Group Homes. Behav Analysis Practice (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-021-00651-y

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Keywords

  • Self-monitoring
  • Positive interactions
  • Text-message feedback
  • Group homes
  • Technology