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Behavior Analysis in Practice

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 406–410 | Cite as

Examining a Web-Based Procedure for Assessing Preference for Videos

  • Hugo CurielEmail author
  • Emily S. L. Curiel
  • Anita Li
  • Neil Deochand
  • Alan Poling
Brief Practice
  • 101 Downloads

Abstract

A web-based program was developed to conduct brief multiple-stimulus without replacement preference assessments for videos (e.g., movies, cartoons, music videos). The preference assessment program was used with two populations: young adults with developmental disabilities and school-age children with emotional and behavioral needs. Stimulus preference hierarchies were identified for all participants, indicating that a web-based preference assessment procedure is an efficient procedure for isolating highly preferred videos, which might be useful as reinforcers in a variety of settings.

Keywords

stimulus preference assessment reinforcer videos technology 

Notes

Funding

This study was not funded.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Conflict of Interest

Hugo Curiel declares that he has no conflict of interest. Emily Curiel declares that she has no conflict of interest. Anita Li declares that she has no conflict of interest. Neil Deochand declares that he has no conflict of interest. Alan Poling declares that he has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special Education and Literacy StudiesWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA
  3. 3.School of Human ServicesUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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