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Behavior Analysis in Practice

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 289–306 | Cite as

Promoting Generalized Advanced Language Skills of Children in Intensive Behavioral Intervention with Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge Generalization Module (PEAK–G)

  • Sarah M. Dunkel-JacksonEmail author
  • Mark R. Dixon
Research Article

Abstract

The Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge Relational Training System Generalization Module (PEAK–G; Dixon, 2014) was used within a community-based intensive behavioral intervention (IBI) program to enhance the generalized advanced language skills of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Four multiple-baseline, across-behaviors designs were used to assess the effectiveness of the PEAK–G “train and test” discrete trial training (DTT) method on directly trained and generalized language skills. After implementing PEAK–G, directly trained language skills increased for all participants, and generalization to test stimuli was observed for two participants, with some generalization observed for a third participant. These data suggest that PEAK–G may be a viable option for community-based practitioners to promote more advanced generalized language skills to children who have mastered early language skills.

Keywords

Generalization Autism Train and test Verbal behavior 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Shannon Borch, Jenn Watts, Jen Hocking, Donna MacDonald, Frances Donovan, Ginny Carriere, Melecia Washington, Renee Ruddock, Sandie Hoskin, Sarah Burch, and Simone Bégin.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from the parent or legal guardian of all individual participants included in the study. Additional informed consent was obtained from the parent or legal guardian of all individual participants for whom identifying information is included in this article. This research is based on data used in Sarah M. Dunkel-Jackson’s doctoral dissertation.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rehabilitation InstituteSouthern Illinois University and Kinark Child and Family ServicesMarkhamCanada
  2. 2.Behavioural Psychology ProgramSeneca CollegeKing CityCanada
  3. 3.Rehabilitation InstituteSouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondaleUSA

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