Positive Behavior Support for Individuals with Behavior Challenges

Abstract

Individual positive behavior support (PBS) is a process that combines evidence-based practices from applied behavior analysis (ABA) and other disciplines to resolve behavioral challenges and improve independence, participation, and overall quality of life of individuals living and learning in complex community environments. Its features include lifestyle enhancement, collaboration with typical caregivers, tracking progress via meaningful measures, comprehensive function-based interventions, striving for contextual fit, and ensuring buy-in and implementation. This article will summarize the features and illustrate with a case example.

• Engaging caregivers to take an active role in behavioral intervention

• Designing interventions that work effectively within natural routines

• Addressing lifestyle changes, as well as more discrete behavior changes

• Creating strategies that are durable, reducing dependence on professionals

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Correspondence to Meme Hieneman.

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Meme Hieneman is a consultant working with programs that serve children with significant behavioral challenges.

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Hieneman, M. Positive Behavior Support for Individuals with Behavior Challenges. Behav Analysis Practice 8, 101–108 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-015-0051-6

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Keywords

  • Positive behavior support
  • Quality of life
  • Collaboration
  • Comprehensive function-based interventions
  • Contextual fit