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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 275–323 | Cite as

A Bibliographic Tribute to Jack Michael

  • Barbara E. Esch
  • John W. Esch
Discussion/Review Article

Abstract

“In the late 1950’s, Jack Michael, a bright but irritating young psychology instructor, moved from the Universities of Kansas to Houston to Arizona State. Along the way he befriended two nontraditional students, protected them through their Ph.D. programs, and turned them loose on the world: Teodoro Ayllon…and Montrose Wolf…” (Risley, 2001, p. 267). So begins Risley’s chapter on the origins of applied behavior analysis. For almost 50 years, Jack Michael provided a model for us to “talk like Skinner” and to analyze behavior as Skinner would. For this, he has been widely respected and revered. The purpose of this bibliography is to explain to new and familiar readers alike Jack’s contributions to the field of behavior analysis in areas of his primary focus: (a) behavioral function taxonomy, (b) motivation, (c) reinforcement, (d) response topographies, (e) multiple control, (f) duplic and codic verbal behavior, and (g) teaching. Throughout, we weave his role in the field’s history and his leadership in its expansion, as these have been additional areas of significant contributions. Above all, we wish to highlight Jack’s work, in bibliographic and narrative form, in a way that expresses a heartfelt tribute on behalf of his students and others whom he influenced to learn about psychology as a natural science and to think and talk like Skinner.

Keywords

Jack Michael bibliography verbal behavior motivating operations stimulus control 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Ed Morris, Dave Palmer, Hank Schlinger, and Mark Sundberg for their recollections and their helpful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript. We also thank Kenzie Gatewood for her prompt and thorough research assistance.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

We, the authors of this manuscript, have no conflict of interest regarding this manuscript.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Esch Behavior ConsultantsLLCKalamazooUSA

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