The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 125–138 | Cite as

Common and Intraverbal Bidirectional Naming

Special Section: The Intraverbal Relation

Abstract

Naming has been defined as a generalized operant that combines speaker and listener behaviors within the individual. The purpose of this paper is to reintroduce the concept of naming and its subtypes, common and intraverbal, distinguish it from other terms such as the tact relation, and discuss the role of naming in the development of verbal behavior. Moreover, a taxonomical change is proposed. The addition of the qualifier bidirectional would serve to emphasize the speaker-listener bidirectional relation and serve to distinguish the technical term from its commonsense use. It is hoped that this paper will inspire future basic and applied research on an important extension of Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior.

Keywords

Development Intraverbal Naming Tact Verbal behavior 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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