The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 225–232 | Cite as

A Comparison of Prompting Strategies to Teach Intraverbals to an Adolescent with Down Syndrome

  • Abigail M. Wallace
  • D. Reed Bechtel
  • Sue Heatter
  • Leasha M. Barry
Special Section: The Intraverbal Relation

Abstract

Ingvarsson and Hollobaugh (2011) investigated tact- or echoic-to-intraverbal transfer of stimulus control to “wh” questions for three preschool-aged boys with autism. The current study was a systematic replication of this study with an adolescent girl with Down syndrome. A multielement design was used to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of picture or echoic prompts presented on an iPad or in vivo to teach “wh” questions. All prompt conditions were effective. Conclusions and recommendations for practice are presented.

Keywords

Down syndrome Intraverbal Transfer of stimulus control 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abigail M. Wallace
    • 1
  • D. Reed Bechtel
    • 1
  • Sue Heatter
    • 1
  • Leasha M. Barry
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Applied Behavior AnalysisUniversity of West FloridaPensacolaUSA

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