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Time to HCV Treatment Disfavors Patients Living with HIV/HCV Co-infection: Findings from a Large Urban Tertiary Center

Abstract

This study aimed to assess time to hepatitis C (HCV) treatment (i.e., the time between the initial clinic visit for HCV evaluation and the HCV treatment start date), to compare clinical characteristics between patients who received HCV treatment ≥ and < 6 months, and to identify predictors of longer time to HCV treatment in patients living with HCV. This study conducted a retrospective secondary analysis of patients living with HCV mono-infection and HIV/HCV co-infection who received HCV treatment with DAAs (n=214) at a HIV Clinic. Binomial logistic regression was used to identify predictors of longer time to treatment (i.e., ≥ 6 months). The median time to HCV treatment was 211 days. Compared to patients who were treated < 6 months, a higher proportion of patients who were treated ≥ 6 months had HIV/HCV co-infection (31% vs. 49%, p=0.01) and chronic kidney disease (8% vs. 18%, p=0.03). In multivariate analysis, HIV/HCV co-infection was positively associated with a longer time to HCV treatment (adjusted odds ratio, aOR=2.0, p=0.03). Time to HCV treatment disparities between African American and White American did not emerge from the analysis, but time to HCV treatment disfavored patients living with HIV/HCV co-infection. Studies are needed to identify and eliminate factors that disfavor patients living with HIV/HCV co-infection.

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This work was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse under Grant R25DA028567 to Dr. Sims.

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Correspondence to Omar T. Sims.

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This study was approved by the institutional review board at University of Alabama at Birmingham. The study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards as laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Analysis of this study—a retrospective analysis of secondary data—was approved by the institutional review board at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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Dr. Sims has received research support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. All other authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

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Sims, O.T., Truong, D.N., Wang, K. et al. Time to HCV Treatment Disfavors Patients Living with HIV/HCV Co-infection: Findings from a Large Urban Tertiary Center. J. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities 9, 1662–1669 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-01105-5

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Keywords

  • Time to HCV treatment
  • HIV/HCV co-infection
  • Disparities
  • DAAs