Evaluating the Efficacy of Video-Based Instruction (VBI) on Improving Social Initiation Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Review of Literature

Abstract

This literature review examined 36 studies that implemented Video-Based Instruction (VBI) to promote the social initiation skills of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Studies that met the criteria were analyzed to determine (a) characteristics of participants, (b) dependent variable(s), (c) independent variable, (d) results, (e) maintenance and generalization, and (f) social validity. Studies were analyzed into categories based on the nature of the independent variable: (a) video modeling, (b) video self-modeling, (c) video modeling and/or video self-modeling in a treatment package, (d) other VBI approaches, and (e) comparative studies. Results of this review strongly support the efficacy of VBI for promoting social initiation skills of children with autism. Discussion of findings and further recommendations for research are provided.

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Correspondence to Lema Kabashi.

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Kabashi, L., Kaczmarek, L.A. Evaluating the Efficacy of Video-Based Instruction (VBI) on Improving Social Initiation Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Review of Literature. Rev J Autism Dev Disord 4, 61–81 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40489-016-0098-5

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Keywords

  • Autism
  • Children
  • Video-based instruction
  • Social initiations