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Journal of Ultrasound

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 1–9 | Cite as

SICUS and CEUS imaging in Crohn’s disease: an update

  • Giammarco Mocci
  • Vincenzo Migaleddu
  • Francesco Cabras
  • Danilo Sirigu
  • Domenico Scanu
  • Giuseppe Virgilio
  • Manuela Marzo
Review

Abstract

Endoscopy remains the main technique in the diagnosis and treatment of Crohn’s disease (CD); nevertheless, the recent development of innovative and non-invasive imaging techniques has led to a new tool in the exploration of small bowel in CD patients. This paper reviews the available data on ultrasound imaging used for the evaluation of CD, highlighting the role of small intestine contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with the use of oral and intravenous contrast agents.

Keywords

Crohn’s disease Contrast-enhanced ultrasound Small intestine contrast ultrasonography 

Sommario

Nell’iter diagnostico e terapeutico della malattia di Crohn l’endoscopia rappresenta la principale metodica strumentale. Tuttavia, la recente introduzione di tecniche di imaging innovative e non invasive ha implementato lo studio dell’intestino nelle malattie infiammatorie croniche intestinali. La seguente revisione raccoglie i dati disponibili in letteratura relativi all’utilizzo dell’ecografia con mezzo di contrasto, sia orale (SICUS) sia endovenoso (CEUS), nella valutazione dei pazienti affetti da malattia di Crohn.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

This review was not funded by any grants.

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Società Italiana di Ultrasonologia in Medicina e Biologia (SIUMB) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giammarco Mocci
    • 1
  • Vincenzo Migaleddu
    • 2
  • Francesco Cabras
    • 1
  • Danilo Sirigu
    • 2
  • Domenico Scanu
    • 2
  • Giuseppe Virgilio
    • 2
  • Manuela Marzo
    • 2
  1. 1.Gastroenterology UnitBrotzu HospitalCagliariItaly
  2. 2.Sardinian Mediterranean Imaging Research Group, SMIRG No-profit FoundationSassariItaly

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