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A Family-Directed Approach for Supporting Individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Abstract

Purpose of the Review

The current review proposes a theoretical framework to support professionals in collaborating with families in the provision of services for children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Existing models of family-directed care and family contextual factors relevant to planning interventions were reviewed. This information was adapted and integrated in the context of available evidence regarding the provision of evidence-based approaches for children with FASD and their families.

Recent Findings

The proposed theoretical framework integrates a family-directed approach to brain injury model, which includes key components of hope, family expertise, and education/skill building with the social economy model of excluded families. This provides a comprehensive approach to supporting the complex needs of children with FASD and their families.

Conclusions

Specialist services for children with FASD and their families are significantly limited around the world. The proposed model provides a theoretical framework for educating and supporting practitioners and family members, to facilitate collaborative service provision for children with FASD and their families.

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Funding

NR received grants from a Creswick Foundation Fellowship. AC received grants from Lotteries Health Research Post-Doctoral Fellowship. HCO received grants from the FASD Bernard Family Trust.

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Correspondence to Natasha Reid.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Conflict of Interest

Author HCO is the developer of the Families Moving Forward Program, author JK is one of the developers of the GoFAR and MILE programs, and author CP is one of the developers of the FMF Connect App. All other authors declare no competing interests.

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Reid, N., Crawford, A., Petrenko, C. et al. A Family-Directed Approach for Supporting Individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Curr Dev Disord Rep 9, 9–18 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40474-021-00241-1

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