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New Psychoactive Substances (NPS), Psychedelic Experiences and Dissociation: Clinical and Clinical Pharmacological Issues

  • Dissociation and Addictive Behaviors (J Billieux and A Schimmenti, Section Editors)
  • Published:
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A Correction to this article was published on 07 May 2019

This article has been updated

Abstract

Purpose of the Review

A significant increase in the number, type and availability of new psychoactive substances (NPS) with dissociative and psychedelic potential has occurred worldwide over the last few decades. Psychedelic substances have historically been used in order to achieve altered states of consciousness such as dissociative states. We aimed here at describing both a large number of novel ketamine-like dissociatives and tryptamine/lysergamide/phenethylamine psychedelics available, whilst describing the acute/long-term clinical scenarios most commonly associated with their intake.

Recent Findings

An updated overview of the clinical and clinical pharmacological issues related to some of the most popular NPS categories has been provided, describing both psychosis and remaining psychopathological issues related to them.

Conclusions

Although the complex link between NPS and psychiatric illnesses is yet to be fully understood, NPS misuse is now a significant clinical issue and an increasing challenge for clinicians working in both mental health and emergency departments.

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Change history

  • 07 May 2019

    The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake.

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Schifano, F., Napoletano, F., Chiappini, S. et al. New Psychoactive Substances (NPS), Psychedelic Experiences and Dissociation: Clinical and Clinical Pharmacological Issues. Curr Addict Rep 6, 140–152 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40429-019-00249-z

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