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Relations between soil heterogeneity and common reed (Phragmites australis Trin. ex Steud.) colonization in Keriya River Basin, Xinjiang of China

Abstract

How common reed (Phragmites australis Trin. ex Steud.) colonization correlates to soil heterogeneity and environmental determinants remains unclear in arid areas. We conducted a field investigation and soil sampling in 100 plots along Keriya River Basin to uncover the relationship between common reed and heterogeneous soils. Reed colonization variables and its soil properties were measured and recorded for the analysis of their relationship using pearson correlation and redundancy analysis methods. The comparison results of common reed characteristics among 100 plots showed that common reeds performed strong tolerance and ecophysiological plasticity to edaphic stresses. Common reed colonization was tightly connected to soil heterogeneity according to the correlation analysis between its colonization characteristics and soil properties. Common reed colonization got feedbacks on soil properties as well, including the increase of soil organic matter and the alleviation of salt uplifting. The main limiting environmental determinant of common reed colonization was soil salt, followed by pH and soil water content.

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Gong, L., Li, C. & Tiyip, T. Relations between soil heterogeneity and common reed (Phragmites australis Trin. ex Steud.) colonization in Keriya River Basin, Xinjiang of China. J. Arid Land 6, 753–761 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40333-014-0031-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40333-014-0031-7

Keywords

  • soil heterogeneity
  • plant colonization
  • common reed
  • plasticity
  • determinant