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Optimization of reed-specific degrading bacteria by response surfaces for remediation of crude oil-polluted soil in Xinjiang, China

Abstract

This paper discussed the optimization of conditions for remediation of crude oil-polluted soil based on pot experiment by applying reed-specific degrading bacteria, and using response surfaces methodology. We took the initial crude oil concentration, the amount of inoculation, the ratio of nitrogen and phosphorus, and the use of surfactant (Tween-80) as independent variables (factors), and the degrading ratio of crude oil as the dependent variable (response) after a 90-day experiment. The experiment explored the impacts of each independent variable and their interactions on the bioremediation of crude oil-polluted soil using the Box-Behnken design. Working with a simulated forecasting model the study obtained optimization values for the treatment parameters of 200 g/kg of the reed+specific degrading bacteria, a nitrogen to phosphorus ratio of about 6.0, and 0.2% surfactant. Under experimental conditions, for crude oil concentrations of 10, 30 and 50 g/kg, the optimal effects of the treatments achieved 71.87%, 66.61% and 54.52% degradation of the crude oil, respectively. The results can provide a basis for the technical development of plant-microorganism combined bioremediation of crude oil-polluted soil.

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Correspondence to YaMing Dong.

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Dong, Y., Zhao, C., Cai, Y. et al. Optimization of reed-specific degrading bacteria by response surfaces for remediation of crude oil-polluted soil in Xinjiang, China. J. Arid Land 5, 408–414 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40333-013-0167-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40333-013-0167-x

Keywords

  • crude oil pollution
  • plant-microorganism
  • response surfaces
  • soil remediation