Responses of the magnetic susceptibility and chromaticity of loess to temperature in a coal fire area

Abstract

Spontaneous combustion of coal seams can produce very high temperature (generally between 600 and 850 °C, even reach to 1000 °C), which greatly changes the properties of the surface loess layer, such as its magnetic susceptibility and chromaticity. In order to study a fast, effective and nondestructive method to determine the influence range of coal seam spontaneous combustion zone, and to provide important clues for the development and utilization of coal seam and burnt rock, the mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (χ) and redness chromaticity (Δa) of loess samples were measured after heating to 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C, 700 °C, 800 °C or 900 °C in a furnace. The results show that the redness chromaticity of loess increases linearly with temperature in the range of 300–900 °C, and the mass-specific magnetic susceptibility decreases suddenly above 700 °C. These changes in mass-specific susceptibility and redness chromaticity with temperature are related to the degree of iron compounds conversion.

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All data generated or analysed during this study are included in this published article.

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Opening Project of Key Laboratory of Coal Resources Exploration and Comprehensive Utilization, Ministry of Natural Resources (No. KF2021-7), National Science Foundation of China (No. 41672279), Natural Science Basic Research Program of Shaanxi Province(No. 2020JQ-744), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2020M673443) and the Excellent Doctoral Dissertation Cultivation Program of Xi 'an University of Science and Technology.

Funding

Opening Project of Geological Research Institute for Coal Green Mining (grant no. MTy2019-13); National Science Foundation of China (grant no. 41672279).

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WSF and SQ designed the experiment, and WSF was a major contributor in writing the manuscript. WNQ analyzed and interpreted the experiment data regarding the magnetic susceptibility and chromaticity of loess. LT and ZH performed the operation of the experiment. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Shaofei Wang.

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Wang, S., Sun, Q., Wang, N. et al. Responses of the magnetic susceptibility and chromaticity of loess to temperature in a coal fire area. Acta Geod Geophys (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40328-021-00349-1

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Keywords

  • Coal spontaneous combustion
  • High temperature
  • Loess
  • Magnetic susceptibility
  • Chromaticity