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Resistance Training as a Tool for Preventing and Treating Musculoskeletal Disorders

Abstract

The aging process is characterized by several physiological, morphological, and psychological alterations that result in a decreased functional and health status throughout the life span. Among these alterations, the loss of muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is receiving increased attention because of its association with innumerous age-related disorders, including (but not limited to) osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, low back pain, risk of fall, and disability. Regular participation in resistance training programs can minimize the musculoskeletal alterations that occur during aging, and may contribute to the health and well-being of the older population. Compelling evidence suggest that regular practice of resistance exercise may prevent and control the development of several musculoskeletal chronic diseases. Moreover, resistance training may also improve physical fitness, function, and independence in older people with musculoskeletal disorders, which may result in improved quality of the years lived. In summary, regular participation in resistance training programs plays an important role in aging and may be a preventive and therapeutic tool for several musculoskeletal disorders.

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Correspondence to Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac.

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Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac and José Messias Rodrigues-da-Silva declare that they have no conflicts of interest relevant to the content of this review.

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Ciolac, E.G., Rodrigues-da-Silva, J.M. Resistance Training as a Tool for Preventing and Treating Musculoskeletal Disorders. Sports Med 46, 1239–1248 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-016-0507-z

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Keywords

  • Bone Mineral Density
  • Total Knee Arthroplasty
  • Muscle Strength
  • Resistance Training
  • Resistance Exercise