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Uveitis Therapy: The Corticosteroid Options

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Abstract

Uveitis is characterized by intraocular inflammation involving the uveal tract; its etiologies generally fall into two broad categories: autoimmune/inflammatory or infectious. Corticosteroids  are a powerful and important class of medications ubiquitous in the treatment of uveitis. They may be given systemically or locally, in the form of topical drops, periocular injection, intravitreal suspension, or intravitreal implant. This review describes each of the currently available corticosteroid treatment options for uveitis, including favorable and unfavorable characteristics of each as well as applicable clinical trials. The main advantage of corticosteroids as a whole is their ability to quickly and effectively control inflammation early on in the course of uveitis. However, they can have serious side effects, whether localized to the eye (such as cataract and elevated intraocular pressure) or systemic (such as osteonecrosis and adrenal insufficiency) and in the majority of cases of uveitis are not an appropriate option for long-term therapy.

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Contributions

Dr. Valdes performed the initial literature search and wrote the initial and subsequent drafts of the manuscript. Dr. Sobrin critically revised all drafts and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Lucia Sobrin.

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Funding

This research was supported financially by a Grant from the National Eye Institute: NIH R01 EY031027: Elucidating novel mechanisms for glucocorticoid-induced ocular hypertension. It was also supported by the MEEI Uveitis and Ocular Immunology Fellowship.

Conflict of interest

Dr. Sobrin is a consultant for Clearside Biomedical, Inc. Dr. Valdes has no conflicts of interest.

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Valdes, L.M., Sobrin, L. Uveitis Therapy: The Corticosteroid Options. Drugs 80, 765–773 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40265-020-01314-y

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